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  1. [WATCH] How to keep teenagers on TB treatment

    TB was the leading cause of death for teenagers between 2008 and 2018 in South Africa. Find out why and what we can do to make treatment more accessible to them in this short video. The post [WATCH]

  2. What the field of psychology owes Black patients

    Psychological research has mostly focused on white people. New research shows, however, that mental health support works better when it’s adapted to suit people’s cultural context. The post What the

  3. “We take the fish out of the water”: Three myths about vasectomies – busted

    A vasectomy is a permanent form of contraception for men. During this surgical procedure, the tubes that take sperm from the testicles to the glands that make semen are cut — in about the time of a lu

  4. This metal is destroying children’s brains — and SA has no plans to remove it

    Children who are exposed to lead — a metal found in certain paints and batteries — can face a number of problems as they grow up. These range from ailments like heart and kidney disorders, to developm

  5. A torchlight tragedy: Inside a Joburg emergency room during loadshedding

    In July, loadshedding left Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital without a CT scanner, a piece of equipment that could have helped a patient who had suffered a serious brain injury. The pos

  6. [WATCH] How to stop South Africa’s codeine problem

    More teens are showing up at drug treatment centres to kick a codeine habit. Some codeine products such as Stilpane are available over the counter without a prescription, so what can be done to preven

  7. The future of SA’s TB plan is locked up in the mysterious minds of teens

    South Africa’s health facilities aren’t geared up to help teens with TB to complete their treatment. As a result, the preventable, treatable disease was the leading cause of death among adolescents in

  8. [WATCH] Books & babies: How to keep young mothers in school

    We travelled to the North West for this video, where we spoke to a young mother who fell pregnant when she was 13, but managed to return to school after her pregnancy. The post [WATCH] Books & ba

  9. Inequality kills: How race, money and power affect who survives COVID

    The data from 440 000 COVID patients reveal that non-white people in South Africa were far more likely to die than their white counterparts. These researchers argue it’s not about genetics or biology.

  10. Would you screen yourself for cervical cancer at home?

    When South Africa introduced self-tests for HIV, far more people knew their status and were put on treatment. The same could happen for cervical cancer, argues this cancer advocate, and the country al

  11. This three-legged potjie doesn’t wobble. NHI lessons for deep rural South Africa

    For years, this mother in the rural Eastern Cape had to travel across a river and walk for two hours to get to a clinic. Then, her community teamed up with a nonprofit and the provincial health depart

  12. [WATCH] How to beat superbugs on a tight budget

    Superbugs are fighting back and our state hospitals don’t have the right specialists or enough funding to stop more germs from becoming untreatable. The post [WATCH] How to beat superbugs on a tight b

  13. The oldest trick in Big Tobacco’s playbook nearly derailed SA’s TB conference. Here’s why

    The Foundation for Professional Development, one of South Africa’s oldest nonprofits and the main sponsor of the TB conference in Durban, accepted a R2-million research grant from an organisation that

  14. Will the UK’s new prime minister cut funds to this malaria jab?

    A malaria vaccine has passed the World Health Organisation’s efficacy rate of 75%. But if the United Kingdom’s new prime minister cuts foreign aid, the people who need the jab may never get it. The

  15. [WATCH] Where SA’s specialist doctors go when managers aren’t looking

    Government hospitals face shortages of specialist doctors. To make it worse, not all of them are showing up to work. The post [WATCH] Where SA’s specialist doctors go when managers aren’t looking appe

  16. ‘Call me Tumi’: Meet the young woman who heads SA’s medicines regulator

    Boitumelo Semete-Makokotlela leads the country’s medicines regulator, the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (Sahpra), a public entity few people knew about until the COVID-19 pandemic

  17. These gun laws saved 30 lives a month in two big cities. Here’s what it could mean for SA

    A recent spate of massacres has reignited the conversation about firearm control. It’s an emotional debate, but what does the evidence say about the kind of policies that work to prevent gun violence?

  18. Myths, migrants, and who benefits from medical xenophobia

    Migrants are being blamed for South Africa’s struggling health system – again. But poor governance, and a shortage of staff and hospital beds are the real issue. The post Myths, migrants, and who ben

  19. This three-legged potjie doesn’t wobble. NHI lessons for deep rural South Africa

    For years, this mother in the rural Eastern Cape had to travel across a river and walk for two hours to get to a clinic. Then, her community teamed up with a nonprofit and the provincial health depart

  20. The minister & the metaphor: A patient’s guide to legal medicine imports

    Medicines for some cancers and rare diseases will never be considered an “essential medicine”, which means the health department will never buy it for state facilities. Many patients have burned their

  21. [WATCH] Why SA’s running out of drugs to treat this superbug

    Healthcare-associated infections occur when a person acquires an infection while they are admitted into a hospital. One of the most deadly is a bacterium that has developed resistance against three ou

  22. Dirty Sprite: The DIY high that keeps SA schoolchildren numb

    Codeine is found in mild painkillers and cough syrups, and is sometimes mixed with Sprite or alcohol to make a drink called “lean”. The post Dirty Sprite: The DIY high that keeps SA schoolchildren nu

  23. How do you stop a hospital heist? Appoint a plunder-proof board

    The way South Africa’s health sector is governed leaves hospitals exposed to corruption. Hospital chief executive officers are political appointments, and so are the people at the accountability bodie

  24. Could new abortion rules in the US affect the world’s biggest state HIV fund?

    The United States government has appointed the first African head of its Aids fund, Pepfar. John Nkengasong, a Cameroonian virologist with US citizenship, will need to establish the potential impact o

  25. One pill within three days of condomless sex could stop three STIs. Here’s how it works

    A cheap antibiotic (called doxycycline) used to treat skin infections and to stop people from getting malaria could also work to prevent chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis, found a United States study

  26. Why are Aids conferences still held in the Global North?

    Researchers have found that 96% of global health conferences happen in high- or middle-income countries. Less than four in 10 attendees at these gatherings are from poorer nations that have the highes

  27. Say hello to Bhekisisa’s new TV show — Health Beat

    Mia and Ayoade Alakija discuss the 2022 International Aids conference and how institutional racism in the global health system affects who gets to have a say in the fight against HIV/AIDS. A South Afr

  28. 44 experts to design details of NHI scheme from January 2023

    Forty-four new National Health Insurance (NHI) positions, based at the national health department head office in Tshwane, will be advertised in the coming weeks and filled by January 2023. The post 4

  29. A junior doctor’s battle to keep death at bay for state patients

    One in four South African medical students show signs of depression, and most doctors are at risk of burning out. Read about one state doctor’s road to hell and back again. The post A junior doctor’s

  30. Why doesn’t SA use this bargaining chip when it makes deals with drugmakers?

    A two-monthy HIV prevention injection could be too expensive for the department of health to buy even though the country participated in drug trials to test the medicine.  In the past, this situation

  31. Would you screen yourself for cervical cancer at home?

    When South Africa introduced self-tests for HIV, far more people knew their status and were put on treatment. The same could happen for cervical cancer, argues this cancer advocate, and the country al

  32. Superbugs could cost you an arm or a leg: Why hospitals need more money to fight drug resistance

    Germs are outsmarting medicine faster than South Africa’s overburdened facilities can keep up with. There are ways to cut resistance, but such plans need more money for them to work. The post Superbug

  33. Naeemah Abrahams and the secret to defeating evil – do something

    In the hospitals of 1980s South Africa, Naeemah Abrahams saw how often women showed up battered and bruised, a phenomenon her colleagues didn’t make much of. Three decades later, she’s one of the rese

  34. [WATCH] What makes a good doctor? Why school marks aren’t everything

    A doctor’s race and the language they speak can play a role in the kind of care they provide - depending on their patient’s race and language. The post [WATCH] What makes a good doctor? Why school mar

  35. Tipsy at breaktime: Do liquor ads increase underage drinking?

    Young South Africans are exposed to lots of liquor advertising, but the two bills which were designed to change this remain stuck in the pipeline. The post Tipsy at breaktime: Do liquor ads increase u

  36. Why it can take a decade to diagnose endometriosis

    Endometriosis is a disease that causes the cells that line the uterus to start growing in other parts of the body. This can lead to excruciating pain for those affected but diagnosis can take more tha

  37. The cruel collusion that devastates young doctors learning how to deliver babies

    Health workers-in-training say they feel forced to abuse birthing patients as part of a dark rite of passage on the road to becoming a doctor or midwife. This final year medical student explains how t

  38. [WATCH] The right people are getting into medical school: More than 90% of medical students pass

    The pass rate for medical students is much higher than for other high entry requirement degrees such as engineering and biology. This video explains why. The post [WATCH] The right people are getting

  39. SA’s moonlight sonata: The illegal cash cow draining specialist care at state hospitals

    Specialist doctors at many state facilities aren’t showing up to work despite earning millions of rands a year in taxpayer money. The consequences for patient health can be devastating but not everyon

  40. [WATCH] From the bin to the burn: How COVID vaccines are destroyed

    Follow the final days of an expired COVID vaccine as they await their turn in the incinerator. The post [WATCH] From the bin to the burn: How COVID vaccines are destroyed appeared first on Bhekisisa.

  41. Tongues & other taboos: Why queer sex ed is good for everyone

    Lesbian teenagers have a lower chance of getting a sexually transmitted infection, but the threat remains. Even though South Africa’s sex education curriculum includes all the right lessons to help pu

  42. [PODCAST] Monkeypox: How it spreads, when to test & why people 42 and up may be protected

    The smallpox vaccine provides 85% protection against infection with monkeypox, but South Africa stopped vaccinating people against smallpox in 1980, so only people of 42 and older who got vaccinated w

  43. Why SA women with postpartum depression go unhelped

    The social and economic factors faced by women do not disappear once they become pregnant. Without additional support those problems get much worse and can be bad for their families too. The post Why

  44. How to get doctors to work outside cities

    The unequal distribution of South Africa’s doctors isn’t limited to the public vs private sector gap. Health workers' willingness to work in rural areas plays a role too. Most medical school graduates

  45. Why we’re saying goodbye to our daily COVID updates

    Bhekisisa has published a COVID-19 infographic every day for more than two years. This project is now coming to an end. Find out what it took to distil the health department’s data into bite-sized chu

  46. Come work with us: We’re hiring 2 reporters and 1 engagement officer

    Bhekisisa has vacancies for two more health journalists and one engagement officer. The post Come work with us: We’re hiring 2 reporters and 1 engagement officer appeared first on Bhekisisa.

  47. Meet the health workers saving lives – earning a measly R670 a month

    What do you do when there aren’t enough rural doctors? In Zimbabwe, village healthcare workers, trained over three weeks, are plugging the gaps. The post Meet the health workers saving lives – earnin

  48. Karoo dust, diet & diabetes: Why ‘lifestyle disease’ is an unfair label

    Diabetes is different from other non-communicable diseases, this author says. It can’t be spread in a literal sense — instead, it is often forced upon people by factors beyond their control. What happ

  49. How to pick good doctors: Why race, language & where people come from must matter

    Opposition groups and others often argue that academic matric marks alone should determine whether someone gets into medical school – not factors such as race that people can’t control. But research f

  50. Inequality kills: How race, money and power affect who survives COVID

    The data from 440 000 COVID patients reveal that non-white people in South Africa were far more likely to die than their white counterparts. These researchers argue it’s not about genetics or biology.